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Lie Detector Test (Polygraph Test)

Dave J February 21, 2017
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Lie Detector Test (Polygraph Test)

How much is a Lie Detector Test?

 

 
 

Trained and accredited

All of our examiners undergo extensive training and have many years of experience conducting polygraph tests (Lie Detector Tests). Our examiners are also fully qualified members of the American Polygraph Association which is widely regarded as the worlds leading association dedicated to providing evidence-based scientific methods for credibility assessment.
 

Discreet & Confidential

Your polygraph test (Lie Detector Test) will be conducted in complete privacy and the results of the test will be handled in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1999. Physical and or digital copies of the results will be provided depending on your preference.
 

Mobile Lie Detector

It may not be possible for you to visit one of our test centres or you may simply prefer not to, in this case we can visit your home or a location of your choice. If you would rather have the polygraph test (Lie Detector Test) conducted at your own home we can travel to you and conduct the test in the comfort of your own home.
 

Do you need to prove that somebody:

– Is lying to you
– Is withholding information
– Is not who they say they are
– Has been unfaithful
– Has stolen from you or others
– Has committed a crime
– Has lied about their background

Book a Polygraph Test

 

Lie Detector Test Near Me

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FAQ's

Polygraph Test / Lie detector Test – What’s the difference?

A lie detector test is just a simple name for polygraph test, there is no difference between the two.
 

How much is a lie detector test?

The cost of the lie detector test will be determined by various factors, the main factors will be the duration of the exam and also the location in which it takes place.

Once you have told us what you are trying to find out we will be able to give you a more accurate idea of how long the exam will take and what the cost will be.

How long does a lie detector test take?

The average polygraph test takes between 1 and 2 hours, we ask you to allow for a minimum of 2 hours although the test may be finished slightly sooner.
 
 

How to cheat on a lie detector test?

People often ask us if there are ways to cheat on a polygraph test, we can confirm there are no proven ways to cheat on a polygraph test. There are various techniques people try to use to obscure the results however our examiners are experienced enough to identify these techniques are trained to work around them ensuring the results of the exam are accurate.

Other Services

  • Matrimonial Investigations

    Matrimonial Investigations

    We are specialists at identifying unfaithful behaviour, dealing with matrimonial issues and catching cheating partners

  • Vehicle Tracking

    Vehicle Tracking

    Our vehicle tracking service lets you monitor a vehicles movements 24 hours a day 7 days a week, with exceptional accuracy.

  • Surveillance

    Surveillance

    Our investigators are trained to the highest standards and ready to conduct surveillance operations within 24 hours

  • Tracing

    Tracing

    Our tracing service will allow you to locate individuals, addresses and phone numbers for even the most evasive of subjects

Theft

Dave J February 5, 2016
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Theft Investigations

Corporate theft, employee theft, embezzlement

 
 

Theft is a threat to companies of all shapes and sizes and is most devastating when being committed internally as it is often the most difficult to identify. Many companies tolerate a small amount of theft because it is too difficult to prove and too expensive to investigate, it is not until the value increases that they seek external help. The problem is that the individuals committing the theft will often become more confident in their actions and if one member of the team feels they can get away with it then the mentality will likely spread to others.

Many companies are disappointed with the level of support they receive from the police when trying to tackle corporate theft but we must remember that what we are dealing with is essentially an internal issue and the police don’t have the time or the resources to launch an investigation into a crime many would deem as victimless.

The common misconception however is that you cannot launch an investigation yourself or with the assistance of a third party investigator, this is not correct. As an employer you are within your rights to launch an investigation and even use hidden cameras without informing staff providing what you are doing is deemed reasonable and the cause is justifiable.

Theft Investigations
 

When gathering intelligence it is important to understand what is legal and what can be done according to pieces of legislation such as ‘The Human Rights Act’ and ‘RIPA The regulatory Investigation of Persons at Work Act’. All investigatory work conducted and all evidence obtained will be done so in accordance with the law.

 

Case Study

One of the directors at a warehousing company notices that a particular piece of stock has gone missing, after looking into the incident they discover that there is no justification; e.g. No damaged goods or errors in stock take. He decides to keep the issue to himself but monitors the stock for the next few weeks, shortly after the next delivery he notices that the incident has occurred again so brings it up with another director.

They decide that the culprit(s) must be leaving some of the items from the delivery at the loading bay and collecting it as they leave the premises. The only logical way they can think of proving this would be to put a hidden camera in the loading bay, but they are concerned that if they notify the staff then the culprit(s) will take more care in hiding it and they will not find out whose responsible.

They contact us and explain the situation so we offer to send a detective to the premises for a meeting, we agree that the best thing to do would be to send the detective in under the pretence they were a safety inspector so they could take a look at the loading bay without raising any suspicion.
Our detective arrives at the premises and conducts a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA); this assessment allows our detective to decide what would be a proportionate response to the problem and also to identify and minimise the privacy risks of the project. Once the assessment has been conducted the detective explains their findings to the directors and suggests the best solution to solve their problem.

Fact: When it comes to the use of hidden, or covert, CCTV cameras in the workplace, the CCTV Code Of Practice says that they must not be used as a run-of-the-mill exercise, i.e. as a means to spy on staff, which would be an unlawful (and potentially criminal) act. However, hidden CCTV cameras are justifiable where: (1) the employer suspects that a specific crime, e.g. theft, is being committed; and (2) it intends to involve the police.

The directors agree that they are happy to proceed and arrange the installation to be carried out at a point when the loading bay is closed so that no staff present. The morning after the next delivery the directors watch the footage back and confirm their suspicions, the culprits were leaving part of the delivery outside the loading bay hidden by a few pallets then collecting them as they made their way back to their vehicles to leave.

A disciplinary hearing was held in which the culprits were questioned about the incident; both denied any knowledge of such theft until shown the footage. They were both dismissed and the directors decided to press criminal charges so the footage was handed to the police and used as evidence.

Rather than removing the cameras completely the directors decided to replace them with clearly visible cameras and put signage in the loading bay to alert staff to the cameras presence and prevent further incidents from occurring.

Further Reading: Surveillance Camera Code Of Practice

WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAID

  • After months of not receiving rent I tried to confront the tenants and they disappeared. I was owed just over £3000 so visited the previous address they supplied but had no luck, all of the phone numbers I had for them were going straight to voicemail so i decided to seek help. I gave the details I had for the tenants and had a new address for them the same week, the case is now going to court and reveal helped me serve the documents as well.

    VN, Speedwell

  • After months of trouble with staff we consulted Reveal for assistance, my case manager arranged a meeting and was very discrete upon his visit. After a brief discussion we decided to put our trust in their hands and we have no regrets. Our main concern was ensuring that we had enough evidence to confirm our suspicions before confronting the two staff members, the team advised us on how best to approach the situation and also when the evidence was sufficient enough to present.

    SME, Montpelier

  • I had been considering calling an investigator for a long time and finally decided I would speak to somebody just to find out if it would even be possible to find out what my wife had been doing. I felt my case manager went the extra mile to make sure I understood what all the options were and really helped me make the decision without trying to be pushy or do something I wasn't comfortable with. Ultimately the evidence was exactly what i needed to move on with my life.

    PK, Lawrence Hill

Hire a detective

Interested in a free Privacy Impact Assessment or need to talk to an advisor?

0117 214 0112 Send us an email

Fraud Investigations

Dave J February 5, 2016
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Fraud Invetigations

Insurance, Personal injury and benefit fraud

 
 

Research conducted by the ABI estimates that in 2013 alone £1.3b of insurance fraud was detected, that works out to an extortionate £3.5m each day. These figures are shocking but it is more worrying to know that an estimated further £2.1b went undetected. These figures only account for insurance fraud and not personal injury or benefit fraud.

The ABI have considered the impact of fraud on consumers and estimated that insurance fraud adds an additional £50 to every household’s annual insurance premium because ultimately consumers paying increased premiums cover the cost of fraud.

Our team have worked on cases of all sizes and have experience working with all natures of fraud. Whether
it is insurance fraud, personal injury fraud or benefit fraud we are happy to assist you in obtaining the evidence needed to resolve the issue.


We offer support all the way through the investigation, from an initial consultation where we offer free advice right through to preparing evidence that can be presented in court. If the evidence is questioned our investigators will be willing to appear in court to support the claims they have made and the witness statement they have provided.
 

Case Study

Our client approached us only 8 days before their court hearing, they wanted to prove that the subject had made false claims about the extent of their physical disability, we were asked to conduct surveillance each afternoon and to observe the subjects movements.

They provided us with a physical description of the subject, their address and their suspected routine. We supplied a single man surveillance team to monitor the subjects property and on the third day noticed that he was being assisted into a vehicle and leaving the property for some length of time.

We reported this back to our client and requested that we increase the surveillance team to include another operative to allow us to pursue the vehicle and observe the subjects behaviour as we felt they were much more likely to act naturally when they were away from their home address.

The following day our team observed the subject leaving the property and pursued the vehicle for approximately 15 miles, we then observed the subject walking from their vehicle into another property. Our team set up in a surveillance vehicle and waited for the subject to return, using a specially designed vehicle our operative was able to obtain high quality footage of the subject walking 200 yards to their vehicle without any assistance.

Our client was ecstatic with the results and presented the evidence in court, the report included a signed witness statement and met all of the requirements of the court however the defence tried to argue that the footage was obtained earlier that stated. Our operative attended court and provided testimony to verify that the footage was indeed obtained at the time/location specified, ultimately the footage was accepted used as a crucial piece of evidence.

WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAID

  • After months of not receiving rent I tried to confront the tenants and they disappeared. I was owed just over £3000 so visited the previous address they supplied but had no luck, all of the phone numbers I had for them were going straight to voicemail so i decided to seek help. I gave the details I had for the tenants and had a new address for them the same week, the case is now going to court and reveal helped me serve the documents as well.

    VN, Speedwell

  • After months of trouble with staff we consulted Reveal for assistance, my case manager arranged a meeting and was very discrete upon his visit. After a brief discussion we decided to put our trust in their hands and we have no regrets. Our main concern was ensuring that we had enough evidence to confirm our suspicions before confronting the two staff members, the team advised us on how best to approach the situation and also when the evidence was sufficient enough to present.

    SME, Montpelier

  • I had been considering calling an investigator for a long time and finally decided I would speak to somebody just to find out if it would even be possible to find out what my wife had been doing. I felt my case manager went the extra mile to make sure I understood what all the options were and really helped me make the decision without trying to be pushy or do something I wasn't comfortable with. Ultimately the evidence was exactly what i needed to move on with my life.

    PK, Lawrence Hill

Hire a detective

Our team are happy to offer free advice and a quote

0117 214 0112 Send us an email

Absenteeism

Dave J February 5, 2016
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Absenteeism

Absenteeism, Long-Term Sickness

 
 

The government has revealed that as many as 960,000 employees were on sick leave for over a month each year on average between October 2010 and September 2013, more than 130 million days are still being lost to sick absence every year in great Britain and working-age ill health costs the national economy £100billion a year.

Companies in the U.K alone spend millions of pounds each year on sick pay but nobody knows exactly what percentage of that is wasted on fraudulent claims. Proving an employee is not genuinely ill or not “able to work” can be a difficult task so it must be handled with precaution or else you may find yourself facing claims of wrongful dismissal and in some situations heavy fines.

You should never make accusations unless you are absolutely positive that you are correct, employees have aright to sick pay so ensure you have sufficient evidence to support your claims before arranging a disciplinary hearing or confronting the employee. Some situations are clearer than other but you should follow the correct procedures regardless of how obvious the fraudulent claim is.

We have worked with cases of absenteeism and also long-term sickness so we know what quality of evidence will be required, the best way to obtain it and the steps that should be followed to ensure the evidence is used and the situation is handled in the correct manner.

Absenteeism & Long-Term Sickness
Have you noticed:

  • Regular patterns of absence?
  • Lack of doctors notes?
  • Unwilling to discuss absence?


Fact: Footage obtained in a cover manner can be produced as evidence in disciplinary proceedings but, as employers can’t make a medical diagnosis, don’t assume it confirms an employee is lying. The footage should be sent to a medical expert, e.g. a GP, so that they can provide an opinion on it – rely on this, not the footage, if you want to dismiss.

 

Case Study

One of the employees at a metal fabricators was carrying a sheet of steel and tripped over a tool he had left on the floor at his work station, as he fell to the floor he hurt his lower back. He went for an examination with the companies doctor and also his own GP, based on the symptoms and level of pain he exhibited both of the medical professionals agreed he was “sick” and unable to work.

The employee was given a sick note and deemed “unable to work” for a month, during this month the employee received full sick pay. 2 Weeks after the sick note was issued a member of the companies HR department claimed she saw the employee at a local supermarket, he was allegedly carrying what looked to be 4 or 5 heavy bags of shopping while talking and laughing with a woman she presumed to be his wife.

The female member of staff spoke with one of the directors as she was aware of the incident that had taken place and didn’t think he would be fit enough to be driving let alone carrying bags of shopping. After some thought the directors decided that they would like to find out if it was indeed the employee in question so they asked us to conduct some covert surveillance and see how he was spending his time.

We supplied a surveillance team to wait near the employees property and observe his movements, on the third afternoon of surveillance the employee left his home, got into his vehicle and drove to a local driving range. One of the detectives hired a club and went through to the driving range a few moments after the employee, using a hidden body worn camera the detective was able to obtain high quality footage of the employee playing golf and showing no signs of back pain.

After a while the detective returned to the vehicle where they waited for the employee to leave, he left the driving range in his vehicle and headed to the local supermarket where he had initially been spotted. This time the other detective followed into the supermarket and obtained footage of the employee walking around pushing a trolley and reaching high shelves, he then walked from the supermarket to his vehicle and left the supermarket.

Once the footage had been reviewed the directors sent the footage to a medical expert from a mutual third party and asked if they felt the subject shown in the footage was suffering with the injuries he had claimed. The medical expert said he felt the actions seen in the video were not that of a man who was suffering from the injuries he had claimed.

A disciplinary hearing was arranged with the employee and the directors presented him with the footage along with the statement from the GP. The employee admitted gross misconduct for fraudulently claiming sick pay and handed in his letter of resignation rather than trying to dispute the companies claims.
Covert Surveillance used in case of fraudulent sickness: Pacey v Caterpillar Logistics Services (UK) Ltd 2011

WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAID

  • After months of not receiving rent I tried to confront the tenants and they disappeared. I was owed just over £3000 so visited the previous address they supplied but had no luck, all of the phone numbers I had for them were going straight to voicemail so i decided to seek help. I gave the details I had for the tenants and had a new address for them the same week, the case is now going to court and reveal helped me serve the documents as well.

    VN, Speedwell

  • After months of trouble with staff we consulted Reveal for assistance, my case manager arranged a meeting and was very discrete upon his visit. After a brief discussion we decided to put our trust in their hands and we have no regrets. Our main concern was ensuring that we had enough evidence to confirm our suspicions before confronting the two staff members, the team advised us on how best to approach the situation and also when the evidence was sufficient enough to present.

    SME, Montpelier

  • I had been considering calling an investigator for a long time and finally decided I would speak to somebody just to find out if it would even be possible to find out what my wife had been doing. I felt my case manager went the extra mile to make sure I understood what all the options were and really helped me make the decision without trying to be pushy or do something I wasn't comfortable with. Ultimately the evidence was exactly what i needed to move on with my life.

    PK, Lawrence Hill

Hire a detective

Concerned about an employee or noticed a pattern of absence?

0117 214 0112 Send us an email

Corporate Tracing

Dave J February 5, 2016
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Corporate Tracing

Debtors, Missing Tenants, Beneficiaries, Absconders, Defence Witnesses

 
 

What is tracing?
The term ‘tracing’ is used to describe the process of locating an individuals current address, once an individual has moved properties or changed contact details it can be incredibly difficult to regain contact especially if that individual has a reason not to be found.

We often see situations where the individual is not making an attempt to hide, they have simply moved properties and systems haven’t been updated to reflect the changes; in other situations the individual has a reason not to be found which usually tends to be debt related.

In many situations the individual needs locating because they have either changed address or contact details and the system used to store those details has not been updated with the most recent information. We often find that people who fail to notify you of their address change have done so with the intention of making it difficult to find them and usually have a motive that is often debt related.

Our service is completely discrete and we will never make any attempt to contact the subject unless you have specifically requested we do so, we have helped companies recover thousands in bad debt by finding these individuals however tracing is not limited to locating gone away debtors.

Corporate Tracing

  • Absconders
  • Beneficiaries
  • Defence Witnesses
  • Missing Tenants
  • Previous Colleagues



Do not be deterred by a lack of information about your subject, through a combination of skill, determination and industry experience, we have successfully traced individuals using only the tiniest fragments of information.

 

Case Study

One of our clients had been named as the executor of an old friends estate, when the friend passed away our client was dealing with the will but was having trouble locating one of the beneficiaries that had been listed. He sent letters to the address but the post was returned saying that the individual had moved out of the property some years ago.

The client had the beneficiaries full name and a previous address but did not have a date of birth or any idea where they may have moved to, using the information he had we ran various searches and couldn’t find anything more recent than an address we found they were present at approximately 5 years ago.

We looked at the possible options and did some searches to see who was resident at the address with them 5 years ago when we noticed that a tenant under a different name with the same date of birth was also linked to the property at the same time. We followed the trail under the new name and were able to locate a new address for our potential beneficiary.

If you are trying to find somebody who has recently gone missing the first thing you should do is report it to the police and the Missing Persons Website
 
We spoke to our client and found out that he knew the beneficiary had family in that city and was likely it could be them but would like us to visit the property in order to confirm that we had the correct address before sending any more paperwork to them.

We made a visit to the address and after speaking to the tenant found out that they had changed their name by deed poll after a divorce and didn’t want to take her maiden name. She showed us documentation to prove that she was indeed the beneficiary we had been trying to locate and agreed to contact our client to discuss the will. We left her the contact details and she was able to contact our client who arranged a meeting to discuss the estate and inheritance.

WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS SAID

  • After months of not receiving rent I tried to confront the tenants and they disappeared. I was owed just over £3000 so visited the previous address they supplied but had no luck, all of the phone numbers I had for them were going straight to voicemail so i decided to seek help. I gave the details I had for the tenants and had a new address for them the same week, the case is now going to court and reveal helped me serve the documents as well.

    VN, Speedwell

  • After months of trouble with staff we consulted Reveal for assistance, my case manager arranged a meeting and was very discrete upon his visit. After a brief discussion we decided to put our trust in their hands and we have no regrets. Our main concern was ensuring that we had enough evidence to confirm our suspicions before confronting the two staff members, the team advised us on how best to approach the situation and also when the evidence was sufficient enough to present.

    SME, Montpelier

  • I had been considering calling an investigator for a long time and finally decided I would speak to somebody just to find out if it would even be possible to find out what my wife had been doing. I felt my case manager went the extra mile to make sure I understood what all the options were and really helped me make the decision without trying to be pushy or do something I wasn't comfortable with. Ultimately the evidence was exactly what i needed to move on with my life.

    PK, Lawrence Hill

Hire a detective

Having trouble locating somebody?

0117 214 0112 Send us an email